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Thiselton Lectures

Thiselton Lecture, 2016

St John's gave a very warm welcome to Revd Dr Jenni Williams on 2 June 2016 as she came to deliver this year's Thiselton Lecture - 'What has feminism ever done for us? Reading the Bible as an evangelical feminist and why that might be good for the Church' 

Jenni is the Tutor in Old Testament at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. Prior to ordination Jenni taught modern languages in Oxfordshire and Manchester. She was ordained in the Diocese of Manchester and now serves as Associate Minister in St Peter Wootton. Her areas of research interest include feminist biblical criticism and hermeneutics generally.

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Thiselton Lecture, 2015

We were delighted on 4th June 2015 to welcome Dr Angus Paddison to St John's to deliver the annual Thiselton Lecture, 'Theological Interpretation - what next?'

Angus Paddison is Reader in Theology at the University of Winchester. He is the author of Theological Hermeneutics and 1 Thessalonians and Scripture: A Very Theological Proposal, with his most recently edited book focused on the Bible's role in society and public theology. His current research is centred on theologically understanding the role the Bible plays within the lives of Christians, inside and outside the church. He worships at St Lawrence in the Square, Winchester.

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Thiselton Lecture 2014

Dr Richard Briggs delivered this year's Thiselton Lecture entitled '"These Are The Days of Elijah": The Hermeneutical Move from Applying the Text to Living in its World'. 

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This paper offers an alternative to the commonly held view that one of the goals of the interpreter is to "apply" the Bible to today. First, an exemplar of such an approach is considered (Howard Marshall's Beyond the Bible), an account not atypical of evangelical hermeneutical concerns. It is then suggested that one key theological notion which does not sufficiently trouble this account is that of canon, and in particular the two testament structure of Christian scripture. This has immediate implications for the resultant figural structuring of time in particular, which maps Old into New in ways which are theologically programmatic for how we understand "today" (as long as it is called today). More briefly, it is also argued that the canon sets forth a "secondary world" or a realistic account of reality which again requires something other than a notion of moving from "then" to "now" (or from "there" to "here"). In conclusion, a wager is offered that if one pursues this kind of enriching or intensifying account of the relevance of scripture to the present day, then the kinds of issues and questions which will end up emphasized and probed will be both theologically important and also of relevance to today's differently-shaped issues and questions.